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Hair Problems In Addition To Hair Loss

Hair Problems In Addition To Hair Loss

31 May, 2022

It’s hard to imagine dealing with one more thing when you’ve already lost your hair. We get it. Hair loss is frustrating, to say the least. But the reality is that in addition to hair loss, you may also end up with (god forbid not!) some other hair problems to deal.

But not to worry. Some of the most common hair problems you could face may seem scary at first, but they’re often treatable.

Razor Bumps

Razor swollen is a common skin condition after shaving. After shaving, ingrown hairs can grow back into the skin and cause inflammation.

The most obvious symptom to look out for is itching or pain in the area you normally shave. You may also see patches of dark skin, or in advanced cases, a real bump in the affected area.

For severe razor burns, you can try a topical cream to relieve pain or itching, or a retinoid cream to prevent acne. If your razor burn is mild, you can use an over-the-counter toner that contains benzoyl peroxide.

Hair follicle cyst

Hair cysts are bumps that appear on the scalp. They’re noncancerous cysts that can be more uncomfortable than the razor bumps we just discussed.

Cysts may sound scary, but they don’t usually cause panic. They occur in about 10% of the population, making them the most common skin cysts.

Follicular cysts are round, sometimes dome-shaped, located just below the surface of the skin. They can also be identified by a small dark plug. In some cases, they ooze what’s called a “cheese-smelling pus.”

Since these are benign cysts, they do not require immediate treatment. However, doctors can remove them to relieve symptoms and discomfort. Less severe cases of follicular cysts tend to resolve on their own.

True folliculitis

This is the last bump we’re going to address. There are several forms of folliculitis. But no matter which type you have, each can cause inflamed, infected, or irritated hair follicles.

You will see swollen areas that usually look like pimples on the scalp. In severe cases, these bumps may also crust over and have a burning sensation.

We recommend a regimen of antibacterial cleansers, hot towels, and anti-itch creams. More severe cases may require prescription antibiotics.

Seborrheic dermatitis

If you’ve ever seen or heard of seborrheic dermatitis, think dandruff.

It’s a common condition and hair problem that causes your scalp to become flaky. While this has been a source of embarrassment for generations, the good news is that it’s rarely serious.

The symptoms of seborrheic dermatitis are easy to spot. This includes dander on the scalp, hair, eyebrows and even clothing. It can also cause an itchy scalp.

Seborrheic dermatitis is annoying but treatable. Most of the time, a special shampoo is the most effective thing to do. One of the most popular options is ketoconazole, which is available by prescription or over the counter. Not only does it help treat dandruff, but it also reduces the side effects of minoxidil.

Tinea capitis

The many articles you find on Google about tinea capitis make you think it’s time to write a will. So before we get started, take a deep breath and don’t worry – it’s not as bad as it sounds.

Tinea capitis is also known as scalp ringworm. It’s a fungal infection of the scalp and hair shaft. Tinea capitis is highly contagious. If you think you may have it, it’s important to get diagnosed as soon as possible to prevent transmission.

Signs of tinea capitis include redness, itching, scaling, and hair loss. You should also look for small black spots where hair falls out on the scalp. These patches grow or expand over time.

Your doctor may prescribe an antifungal topical treatment or shampoo to relieve symptoms of tinea capitis. The most popular antifungal drugs include griseofulvin and terbinafine, both of which are prescribed for six weeks.

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